Going Solo for Canada: Canadianisms on exhibit in Sherwood Park, Alberta

On Friday, January 6th my solo art show five years in the making met the eyes of Canadian art lovers in Sherwood Park Alberta, just outside of Edmonton. CANADIANISMS: A Half Decade Inspired by Canada is a collection of 37 of the most memorable and unique pieces from the past five years of my journey across the Canadian landscape, and into our national subconscious. Here are some photos from the opening night. The show runs until February 26, 2017 at Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - curated by Brenda Barry Byrne and presented by Strathcona County and Festival Place Cultural Arts Foundation.

CANADIANISMS: A Half Decade Inspired by Canada - front window Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - showing hand painted art crates by Brandy Saturley

Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - exhibition view

Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 curator Brenda Barry Byrne and artist Brandy Saturley

Sherwood Park Alberta Mayor Roxanne Carr and Canadian artist Brandy Saturley

Festival Place Cultural Arts Foundation members and artist Brandy Saturley

Talking art with the ladies 

Artist Talk by Brandy Saturley - Strathcona County Art Gallery @501

Artist Talk by Brandy Saturley - Strathcona County Art Gallery @501

Talking art at Gallery @501 art opening

Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - exhibition view, opening night "Canadianisms" by Brandy Saturley

Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - exhibition view, opening night "Canadianisms" by Brandy Saturley

Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - exhibition view, opening night "Canadianisms" by Brandy Saturley

Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - exhibition view, opening night "Canadianisms" by Brandy Saturley

Strathcona County Art Gallery @501 - exhibition view, opening night "Canadianisms" by Brandy Saturley

The Third recap of 2016 – My epic adventure through the Canadian Landscape & Two Major solo art shows celebrating Canada’s sesquicentennial.

The first three months were bustling with art sales and opportunities, the second quarter continued to build momentum in and out of my art studio, and the summer of 2016 was pure passion and pay-off. With Yellowknife, Edmonton, and Winnipeg providing inspiration, opportunity, and the chance to connect with the people, artists and art galleries across Canada. 

In July: The day before I jetted off to The North, I finished a new painting inspired by my journey across the Canadian landscape over the past six years. A painting that speaks of taking this journey together, and connecting across this vast country.

 We Can Fit in My Canoe - 48 x 24 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

We Can Fit in My Canoe - 48 x 24 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

Canada Day 2016 found me in Yellowknife. Six days on The Edge of The Arctic Circle. Canada's Northern Desert, a place where 'helping your neighbor' really is the first order of business and the only way to survive in this land of extreme weather and extreme living. While in town I visited the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, and artists Jen Walden, Jen Luckay, Fran Hurcomb, Steve Schwarz, and Kyle Thomas.  These people have heart and grit and talent beyond whatever expectations I had going in, I love you Yellowknife. The full story of my Yellowknife adventure here.

 Yellowknife Bay on Great Slave Lake | photo Brandy Saturley

Yellowknife Bay on Great Slave Lake | photo Brandy Saturley

In August: I received a formal offer to exhibit my ‘Canadianisms’ with the Okotoks Art Gallery (OAG) near the bustling metropolis of Calgary, Alberta in 2017. This Class A gallery is housed in an old CPR Railway station, a fitting location to show my artworks inspired by Canada. Currently the gallery is showing renowned Canadian Photographer, Edward Burtynsky, more can be found on the OAG website here.

 Okotoks Art Gallery in CPR Railway Station - a Class A Gallery in Alberta

Okotoks Art Gallery in CPR Railway Station - a Class A Gallery in Alberta

Vancouver Island in the summer has a celebratory feel with numerous festivals including the Parksville Sand Sculpting Competition and Exhibition. Art on the beach, the theme this year was 'Things With Wings' - here is one sculpture that caught my eye.

 Parksville Sand Sculpting Competition 2016 | photo Brandy Saturley

Parksville Sand Sculpting Competition 2016 | photo Brandy Saturley

A new painting is completed: The Getaway, inspired by the off-grid culture in Yellowknife.

 The Getaway - 36x36 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

The Getaway - 36x36 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

A family member passed in August and this passing came with the gift of an Alberta road trip. Anytime you have the chance to drive through the Canadian Rocky Mountains, through Jasper National Park, it is a true privilege. In 2010, my first road trip through these giants on the Canadian landscape birthed a series of paintings inspired by these icons. It was nice to see old friends and stand at their feet once again. A reminder that nature truly owns this planet and the more we connect with its gifts, the more we learn about ourselves and our world.

 Mt. Robson Summer 2016 | photo Brandy Saturley

Mt. Robson Summer 2016 | photo Brandy Saturley

A dear friend’s birthday celebrations in Arizona offered up many gifts for the eyes, ears and soul. The desert landscapes reminiscent of Georgia O' Keeffe. Our tour included time visiting a classic car museum and collection that Jay Leno would be envious of, Wayne's Toys is a must see while in the area, boasting more than 50 classics housed in a 20,000 sqft facility. This is a 1961 Messerschmitt KR-200 Bubble Car, just one of the quirky little gems in this collection. More here.

gorddownie

IN GORD WE TRUST! The epic cross-Canada farewell tour for the Tragically Hip came to it’s finale in Kingston, Ontario as all of Canada watched the emotional live broadcast concert. Through the Gord Downie Fund for Brain Cancer Research, founded at the time the lead singer went public with his diagnosis, has now raised over $250,000 for cancer research. It was a beauty day in Canada.

A new painting is birthed, Cottage Royalty. It’s that backyard stage, maybe at the cottage on the lake, maybe by the pool. A loan yellow Adirondack chair framed by led lights. Maybe you are the storyteller, maybe you are strumming the guitar, or maybe your flavour is delivering a great one liner; no matter what your talent, it’s your turn to take the throne and deliver your address to the crowd.

 Cottage Royalty - 24x24 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

Cottage Royalty - 24x24 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

SOLD TO VANCOUVER: this beauty painted on canvas and wood veneer found a new home.

 Canoe Sunset - 30 x 24 acrylic on canvas, 2015 | painting Brandy Saturley

Canoe Sunset - 30 x 24 acrylic on canvas, 2015 | painting Brandy Saturley

NEW PAINTING: it may be the end of the week, a holiday, or just because; no TV required, just a comfy chair, a friend, a beverage and a view; here’s to Summer days!

 On the Dock at Back Bay - 24x24 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

On the Dock at Back Bay - 24x24 acrylic on canvas, 2016 | painting Brandy Saturley

September rolls in…

NEW PAINTINGS ON DISPLAY: six new paintings including the one featured below are now on display in Victoria at Victoria Premium Automobiles in the main showroom. The new paintings were well received at an event hosted by the Prodigy Group, emerging business professionals and business owners in Victoria, BC. 

 Prodigy Group Sept. 2016 mixer @ Victoria Premium Automobiles | paintings Brandy Saturley

Prodigy Group Sept. 2016 mixer @ Victoria Premium Automobiles | paintings Brandy Saturley

 Andrew Valko in his studio | photo Brandy Saturley, 2016

Andrew Valko in his studio | photo Brandy Saturley, 2016

Winnipeg bound! Last stop on this journey had me in Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories, land of the midnight sun and Canada's last frontier. September found me boarding a jet plane for Manitoba; the friendly land of 100,000 lakes and the postage stamp province. While in town I visited the latest architectural and cultural landmark, Canadian Museum for Human Rights. My stops included the historic Fort Garry Hotel, Union Station, The Forks National Historic site where the Red River and The Assiniboine meet and the fur trade provided futures for pioneers. The Manitoba Legislative Assembly, Osbourne Village and the art galleries of the Exchange District. I met with artist Andrew Valko, photojournalist Penny Rogers and enjoyed the solo exhibition by Winnipeg realist painter Karel Funk at the Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG). Manitoba was made for Van Gogh, Wyeth, Rothko and me...the full recap of my visit to The Peg, here:

BIG NEWS: I received a second formal offer for a solo showing of my ‘Canadianisms’ in 2017, this time with  Strathcona County Gallery @501 in Sherwood Park Alberta, just outside the cultural Metropolis of Edmonton. A Class A gallery, my show will be the launch for Canada’s sesquicentennial year. Currently showing the work of aboriginal artist, Jason Carter. More about Gallery @501 here.

As Autumn shines it's golden light and turns leaves crimson, I have come to the completion of a new painting featuring two canoes on a shimmering lake. ‘Complimentary Canoes’ plays with themes of male/female through the use of symbolism, pattern, and vivid colour. With my paintings I want the central image to push forward allowing the viewer to immediately connect with something familiar. As their eyes move across the canvas my hope is they begin to connect to a deeper narrative. Something different to be discovered every time you see the piece.

I am in the studio for a month and then back on the road, this time I will be meeting with artists, galleries and the People of Canada in Eastern Canada. I will be at Art Toronto at the end of October, followed by a side trip to the culturally vivid city of Montreal, finishing up in Canada's Capital of Ottawa and a tour of our National Gallery. An epic year exploring, photographing, and painting Canada leading up to my solo exhibitions in 2017.  The invite list begins here - until then, see you on the road! 

Source: http://www.brandysaturley.com

ART AND THE CITY - Manitoba, the multicoloured and multicultural prairies

The last stop on this journey going deeper into the Canadian subconscious had me in Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories on Canada Day 2016; land of the midnight sun and Canada's last frontier. Last week I packed up my camera and boarded a 737 for Winnipeg, Manitoba; the friendly land of 100,000 lakes and the postage stamp province. 

 Aerial Photo - Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada Photo Brandy Saturley

Aerial Photo - Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada Photo Brandy Saturley

Day 1 – Winnipeg
An endless grid of gold and green, with hues of eggplant and rust imprinted on my mind as I flew into Winnipeg today. Farmers fields freshly swathed and crops being harvested leaving precisely cut patterns for us to view. Puzzle like pieces of land merging with bright white roads and the curves of cerulean blue lakes. This is Manitoba, from the sky. As my yellow cab rolled into downtown I noticed that I am in a truly multicultural city. My multicultural experience continued with my destination today of Canada's Museum of Human Rights. A new destination and the first museum in the world dedicated to the evolution, celebration, and future of human rights. The architecturally impressive structure of glass, marble and concrete houses a collection of thought provoking galleries that explore human rights issues from around the world. A true melting pot experience where every race, religion, creed and belief is represented and honoured through sharing our history. Tonight was a celebration and launch for the Canada150 events coming in 2017. A shoulder to shoulder evening walking six floors of lighted marble ramps reaching to the sky. An impressive and unique museum. Up tomorrow Winnipeg art gallery tour.

 Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnipeg Manitoba - photo Brandy Saturley

Canadian Museum of Human Rights in Winnipeg Manitoba - photo Brandy Saturley

 Leo Mol Sculpture studio museum in Assiniboine Park, Winnipeg

Leo Mol Sculpture studio museum in Assiniboine Park, Winnipeg

DAY 2 - Art in the Exchange District and the Granola Belt
Today was all about the galleries in the exchange district and my host, Andrew Valko. From dawn until dusk we talked Canadian art and took in shows at a handful of galleries including the national fine art appraiser and art dealership, Mayberry Fine Art, artist run centres and even an epic printmaking studio called Martha Street. Assiniboine Park offered a retreat from the city in the Leo Mol Sculpture Garden. Mol was a famous Ukrainian Canadian sculptor and stained glass artist. From The Pope to Terry Fox, wildlife to Moses, he was endlessly inspired to make work. My day ended in the 'Granola Belt' a funky neighborhood called Wolseley with Queen Anne style architecture offering romantic enclosed porches and glowing lanterns. This street has come to attract an array of artists over the years from musicians, to dancers and painters; by far my favourite neighbourhood so far. My night ended with a nice aged tequila sipped between friends and ideas shared. As we passed a roadside billboard reminding us to #artpause , I smiled at the image on the sign.  

 Canadian Realist Painter, Andrew Valko in his studio - Winnipeg, Manitoba | Photo by Brandy Saturley

Canadian Realist Painter, Andrew Valko in his studio - Winnipeg, Manitoba | Photo by Brandy Saturley

 The Fort Garry Hotel in Winnipeg, Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

The Fort Garry Hotel in Winnipeg, Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

Day 3 – The Winnipeg Art Gallery & The Fort Garry Hotel
I'm not a big breakfast person, but when I'm on the road spending long days talking and exploring, protein is a priority to get the day started. The grand old Fort Garry, a century old in fact, is one of Canada's grand CP railway hotels and was designated as a National Historic Site of Canada in 1981. They serve a pretty great breakfast buffet complete with an egg bar where they will make eggs any way, you name it. Florentine, Benedict, scrambled, omelette, poached, hard boiled, you name it the chef at the 'egg' bar whips it up with a side of Canadian pea meal bacon, of course. A nice omelette and a cup of dark roast and I was off to the Winnipeg Art gallery to see Winnipeg artist Karel FunkTom Thomson and the Group of Seven, the WAG collection, The Modernist Tradition, and Qua’yuk tchi’gae’win: Making Good. For lunch I stumbled upon the largest gathering of food trucks I have ever seen at the 'Food Truck Wars' in front of the Winnipeg legislature. Perogies were calling my name along with a cabbage roll and some nice homemade sausage, satisfying the 33% Ukrainian in me, comfort food heaven. I signed in at the legislature and took the grand tour including the must see gallery of painted portraits of mayors and such over the years. I specifically went to see Andrew Valko's impressive and hyper realistic portraiture, something we had talked about yesterday during our visit. My day ended along the Red River at the Forks National historic site where the muddy waters meet the the Assiniboine along the river valley. Another day filled with Canadian Art and Canadian history. Until tomorrow... Below: Lawren Harris, Andrew Valko, Karel Funk and E. Prudence Heward.

 Paintings at The Winnipeg Art Gallery - Karel Funk, E. Prudence Heward, Lawren Harris

Paintings at The Winnipeg Art Gallery - Karel Funk, E. Prudence Heward, Lawren Harris

 At The Crease, by Ken Danby

At The Crease, by Ken Danby

Day 4 - Leaving the city for Happy Rock
Today the second part of my trip began, with a drive almost two hours out of the city to my destination in Gladstone, or 'happy rock'. My hosts none other than the couple who provided the inspiration for my 'Canadiens Gothic' painting. Our day began with lunch at a famous diner named Nick's Inn, family owned and operated for more than 50 years. A good way to begin this leg of the trip providing fuel for an evening of 'Chase The Ace', 50-50 and Meat Draws - all designed to raise funds for the local Gladstone Legion. A stroll down the centre of town back to my hosts home near the railway tracks. Via Rail commuters, grain trains and car drops provided the soundtrack for the evening with the squealing, clanking and horn blowing of steel on steel machines. Tonight I am sleeping in the 'hockey room' with signed photos of Howe, Habs and The Great One. As I tuck in under a beautiful quilt I find myself holding the gaze of the goalie in Ken Danby's famous painting, 'At The Crease'.

 Gladstone, Manitoba grain elevator | photo Brandy Saturley

Gladstone, Manitoba grain elevator | photo Brandy Saturley

 Parks Canada red Adirondack chairs at Clear Lake, Manitoba

Parks Canada red Adirondack chairs at Clear Lake, Manitoba

Day 5 - The land of 100,000 lakes and crops
The destination, Riding Mountain National Park. The problem, put a photojournalist and a visual artist in a car together and you arrive at your destination after succumbing to numerous roadside distractions. Van Gogh worthy fields of giant sunflowers ready for harvest as far as the eye can see, bowing their heads and waiting to be transformed into seed, oil and ethanol. Crops of canola lay flat and orderly in rows, wheat sways, soy a gold and lime green hue, alfalfa with its dioxazine purple blossoms and flax with a dark eggplant tinge. These crops with their colours, shapes and textures induce kaleidoscope eyes. The sounds of crickets, Canada geese, crow, and critters scurrying along the ground provide the soundtrack. Only the need for food and drink could distract us away from Manitoba's serenade. We finally arrived at Riding Mountain National Park. The park is a protected area, the forested parkland stands in sharp contrast to the surrounding prairie farmland. The park protects three different ecosystems that converge in the area; grasslands, upland boreal and eastern deciduous forests. The park is home to wolves, moose, elk, black bears, hundreds of bird species, countless insects and a captive bison herd; and we only saw the birds. Evening found us in Sandy Lake, and then more farmers fields as we headed home. Manitoba was made for Van Gogh, Rothko, Wyeth, and me.

 Hay Bales and Alfalfa fields in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

Hay Bales and Alfalfa fields in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

 Disking the fields in Gladstone, Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

Disking the fields in Gladstone, Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

Day 6 - From farm to table, and one culture to another
I grew up on a small 'hobby farm' of sorts, my parents had a big garden and raised chickens for eggs and meat. As children we never knew store bought bread, and sweets were home baked. I feel lucky to have had such a healthy start to life, which included family meals and hiking in nature. Today my hosts treated me to life on Canada's 'real' farms, the ones that have been farming the land and raising families here for generations. My day began with a visit with the horses and mules, before turning fields that have been harvested, using big expensive machinery. I squeezed into a window seat and rode a 'disker' - a tractor pulling a trailer with rows of disk-shaped steel blades designed to turn the soil, digging deep into the soil and drawing orderly patterns as we rolled along the field. A couple laps and a thank you and we were off to lunch at the golf course. The food here is hearty, well portioned and tasty, fit for those working long days on the farm. Afternoon found us with an invitation to coffee, cake and a private tour of one of the many Hutterite colonies here in Manitoba. A religious colony, the basic tenet of Hutterite society has always been absolute pacifism (nonresistance), forbidding its members from taking part in military activities, taking orders, wearing a formal uniform (such as a soldier's or a police officer's) or contributing to war taxes. They are a peaceful, generous, hard-working and spirited group quite open to sharing their home with us today. With 6500 acres and 85 residents, they are almost totally self sufficient growing food, raising pigs, cattle and chicken, crops, and building all their own structures, furniture, homes and businesses. They run their own schools, make all their clothing, and work together to care for their community. A day spent meeting some people, and characters of Canada in Manitoba. Tomorrow is my last day here, and I am Brandon bound, the second most populous city in Manitoba. Until tomorrow...

 Woodworking Studio at Riverdale Colony in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

Woodworking Studio at Riverdale Colony in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

 Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba | Painting by Colleen Granger

Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba | Painting by Colleen Granger

Day 7 - Spuds, Spirits, Sand and the Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba
For seven days I have been in 'friendly Manitoba' and I can honestly say that when you visit this place you instantly find yourself at the centre of a generous and curious community. Generous with their food, hospitality and in sharing all they have to offer. Curious in what you have to share and offer. A warm coffee, some rye toast, a few good mornings and a handshake later at the Gladstone bakery, and we were off on our day. Our first stop, the potato production line. The soil and climatic conditions in the southern and western regions of Manitoba make it one of the most productive places in Canada to grow potatoes. This results in Manitoba producing approximately one-fifth of Canada's total potato crop. Manitoba has approximately 50% of Canada's French fry production capacity and process over 1200 million pounds of potatoes each year. The potatoes I saw spinning off the trucks onto the conveyor belts today are to become tomorrow's french fries. The mountains of potatoes creating a Canadian landscape of the food variety. From potatoes near Gladstone to art at the Southwestern Manitoba Art Gallery in Brandon, the themes of landscapes, people and what we produce carried throughout the day.

 King of Potato Mountain, Potato production and storage facility in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

King of Potato Mountain, Potato production and storage facility in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

We caught up with painter and sculptor Daryl Hicks at his Eras Antique shop after viewing his show at the AGSM where you can find him buried in collections of Canadiana and curiosities. An antique store and a steak sandwich later, we were refuelled and ready to sink our feet into sandy hills in Manitoba's dune landscapes that began more than 15,000 years ago at Spirit Sands. The Assiniboine River, much larger than it is today, created an enormous delta as it brought glacial meltwaters into ancient Lake Agassiz. Of the original 6,500 square kilometres of delta sand, only four square kilometres remain open; the rest is now covered with a rich variety of plants and wildlife. For centuries people have come here to see something special. World-renowned nature writer Ernest Thompson Seton walked the sandhills wanting to learn more about this unique natural phenomenon. Tomorrow I fly home and process all the gifts received on this trip. Much painting to do, and experiences to process as my journey deeper into Canada's subconscious continues. I am thankful for the generous spirits willing to share their slice of Canadiana, further deepening my connection to this land, our land, that is Canada. My six year love affair with Canada continues as my body of work, #ICONICCANUCK continues to evolve. Next stop, Art Toronto in October. See you there!

 Spirit Sands Dunes in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

Spirit Sands Dunes in Manitoba | Photo Brandy Saturley

Source: http://www.brandysaturley.com